Unclaimed treasure
5 SHARES
0 comments
1708 views
Are you a buyer of lottery tickets? I hope you aren’t, but I would still like you if you were. Garrison Keillor said that the lottery is a tax on people who are not good at math. Early this year somebody bought a Powerball ticket at a gas station in Pewaukee, Wisconsin. In the March 22 drawing, that ticket became a winner. The jackpot by then had grown to $156.2 million. But here’s the thing—you don’t register your name with... Read More
9 SHARES
1 comment
2783 views
My post last week focused on suicide, mental health, and depression in teenagers. But you’re a grown-up now. What about you—and the struggles you’re going through? This world isn’t what we thought it would be. Maybe you’re a millennial and adulthood hasn’t been everything you were promised. For those in the military, serving your country sounds great, but the things you’ve seen and the stress you’ve been under means you understand why the suicide rate is so high among those... Read More
Soul mates
29 SHARES
3 comments
2620 views
Does everyone on earth have a soul mate? By that I mean a person of your approximate age of the opposite sex who is the perfect match, the perfect life partner for you. The Bible does not speak about such a thing, so you can’t expect God to guarantee it. Your answer will have to be drawn from literature, movies, your friends, or your personal experiences. I just found some very thoughtful and helpful writing on the subject of soul... Read More
24 SHARES
3 comments
5281 views
A few months ago, I decided to stop being proud of my kids. Seriously. I noticed that I often said “I’m proud of you” after my kids attained a certain measure of success. I said it sincerely with a full heart and tears in my eyes. As I thought about it, I didn’t want them to think my pride is based on their performance. After all, I love them. Their successes don’t make me love them more. Their struggles don’t... Read More
Privilege
3 SHARES
1 comment
1475 views
It is fashionable these days to heap scorn and guilt on those whose favorable social or economic status is seen as the result of unearned “privilege.” Being Caucasian leads the list of unfair life advantages, of course, but being male, employed, having two married parents, and being comfortable with your birth gender also counts against you in the “privilege” department. The leading champion of “privilege studies” is Prof. Peggy McIntosh of Wellesley College, who has been writing about this type... Read More
31 SHARES
2 comments
3578 views
What’s the 1 reason why you need to talk about 13 Reasons Why? Because you’re the parent.  If you don’t know what I’m talking about, here’s a bit of context. In 2007 author Jay Asher wrote a book titled 13 Reasons Why. It didn’t dominate conversations and news feeds until Netflix adapted it for a 13-episode series and released it on March 31. The fictional show tells the story of teenager Hannah Baker’s suicide—both the events that led up to... Read More
Thank you, Papa Luther
11 SHARES
4 comments
2732 views
This year marks the 500th anniversary of the event generally recognized as having launched the Protestant Reformation—Dr. Martin Luther’s public issuance of his famous 95 Theses, i.e., propositional statements, regarding the sale of indulgences to Christians and the true nature of repentance and forgiveness according to Scripture. Five hundred years is a long, long time. Some Protestants will celebrate that anniversary this October; others are completely oblivious to its significance, or are so caught up in the struggles of the... Read More
7 SHARES
1 comment
1732 views
Please forgive me for that, but I think it’s time we start planning. Not for decorations and presents (although I love buying off season and on clearance), but for which friend, coworker, neighbor, or family member we are going to invite to church. Because Christmas and Easter are the only times that some people are really open to coming to church, it’s the perfect time to start planning to invite them—and then living in a way that gets them open... Read More
Sagging Sundays
7 SHARES
4 comments
2715 views
The Minneapolis Star Tribune recently quoted some pretty grim statistics from Scott Thumma and the Hartford Institute for Religion Research. According to Mr. Thumma, average weekly worship attendance for American churches has sagged from 129 to 80 just in the decade from 2005 to 2015. Arrgh! I knew our country was becoming more secular, but I didn’t think it was happening that fast. The median in my tribe is 75 in weekly worship. One of the coping strategies that the... Read More